BibleThump is another crying child emote, this one the face of Isaac from the indie video game The Binding of Isaac. It’s a more general weeping emoji than BabyRage. It can refer to anything sad or disappointing, and it doesn’t carry the same connotations of immaturity and juvenile whining. It’s presumably called “BibleThump” because The Binding of Isaac was partially inspired by the biblical tale of Isaac.  
Logitech’s goal while creating this mouse was essentially to replicate more than enough movement and speed of the gamers arm, making it a mouse that is able to keep up with those short burst arm movements without causing a delay in speed. With this mouse, the Logitech G402 Hyperion Fury allows you take your gaming capabilities to the next level. We recommend this one if the previous mouse was a bit too expensive for your budget and you wanted to upgrade yet save a little more cash at the same time.
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The emote is mostly innocuous, though in recent years it’s been used with racist connotations by some Twitch users. By mid-2016 and into 2017, users would spam the screen with TriHard whenever a black streamer appeared, often punctuating racist remarks made in-chat. TriHex finally spoke about the emote’s weaponization. He argued that banning the emote meant the bad actors won when there was nothing obscene or offensive about the emote’s conception.
As you might expect, esports pros need some seriously reliable hardware to do their best in the most demanding racing sims. The Thrustmaster TS-PC Racer Racing Wheel fits that bill. With paddle shifters, support for up to 1080 degrees of rotation and a powerful motor that lets you feel the car’s response, the only thing more realistic than this is actually hitting the track in real life.
Not everyone needs a full-powered graphics processing unit to run the very latest games at maximum resolutions, and AMD’s Radeon RX 560 is a good mid-range graphics card. At 1080p resolutions, it's no slouch, running games like "Civilization VI" and "Battlefield 1" at higher than 60 frames per second. The RX 560 also uses less power than larger cards like Nvidia’s GTX 1080, which means it makes less fan noise and puts less strain on regular PC power supplies, which might otherwise need to be upgraded.
We think the following is gear gamers should upgrade if they’re able. Again, you can either do so systematically as you gather some cash, grab a few at once, or setup an entire new rig — it’s all on you! Or perhaps even start building your own gaming computer if you want to save some money as well. If there are some different recommendations or even gear you feel we left out, let us know in the comments. Just as a heads up, click on the links below of the gear to jump to that specific section’s recommendation. We’ll also link you to some of our guides in case you want some more information or additional gear picks to compare and contrast.
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