It’s possible to spend much more on wired stereo headsets for gaming, but the HyperX Cloud Stinger has most of the functionality you could need for just under $50. It’s lightweight and comfortable to wear, thanks to the large over-the-ear foam cups, and features a sturdy design — essential for its survival if you ever drop it. The ear cups also rotate to fold flat, which makes the headset easy to carry around.

Built for the battlefield, the HyperX Alloy Elite is loaded with fast, accurate, and comfortable Cherry MX Blue switches and a durable steel frame. RGB backlit keys and a brilliant 18-LED light bar keep you fragging away long into the night. It’s also equipped to meet your multimedia needs with dedicated media buttons, USB 2.0, Game Mode, anti-ghosting, and N-Key rollover.
*Based on testing using the Mobile Mark 2012 battery life benchmark test. For more information about this benchmark test, visit www.bapco.com. Test results should be used only to compare one product with another and are not a guarantee you will experience the same battery life. Battery life may be significantly less than the test results and varies depending on your product’s configuration, software, usage, operating conditions, power management settings and other factors. Maximum battery life will decrease with time and use.

Once you’ve gotten your hands on your new gaming system you’ll probably want some accessories to go with it. Extra controllers will be a necessity for multiplayer games and you’re going to want a headset for online gaming. Some excellent models from manufacturers like HyperX, Corsair and Razer will be discounted, as well as DualShock and Xbox wireless controllers.


The emote was introduced in 2015, but didn’t pick up steam until 2016 thanks to the speedrunning community. GamesDoneQuick, a semiannual charity event that brings together top speed runners, used the emote to express their discomfort if something cringe-worthy happened during the speedrun or on stream. The emote continued to grow, and was eventually banned by GDQ organizers because of the bullying connotation.
To get you up to speed, we’ve compiled a list of popular emotes below, with the intention of adding more if any rise in popularity, and updating the explanations if the emotes change in meaning. If a particular emote isn’t on the list, but is popular within the circle of streamers you follow, the best way to understand what it means and how it’s used is to ask in chat, on Twitter or check out the streamer’s Reddit page for further details.

What it means: TriHard is an extremely popular, yet controversial emote — and it has a detailed history. Based on a face made by streamer TriHex while at an anime convention in Dallas, the emote didn’t officially become “TriHard” until 2014 when TriHex was speedrunning Yoshi’s Island and noticed a Twitch staff member hanging out in chat. TriHex told Kotaku he did everything possible to get their attention and, essentially, was trying way too hard. So he became TriHard.

A console, a controller and some games are a good start for video game players. Gamers who want to take their play to the next level, however, may want to buy gaming accessories to enhance both their performance and overall experience. For these reasons, gaming accessories are a perfect gift for the gamer in your life. Best Buy stores and BestBuy.com have an excellent selection of gaming accessories.
Since Twitch didn’t want to touch the emote because of legal concerns, according to Bain, he uploaded the photo to BTTV. BTTV, otherwise known as BetterTTV, is a third-party browser extension that allows people to use emotes in chat. Since these aren’t run through Twitch directly, the emotes often circumvent rules. This meant LUL could exist as an emote — a very, very popular emote — on Twitch despite the DMCA takedown. It only grew from there.
But just when you thought you’d learned emoji, now you’ve got a whole new symbolic meme language to master. On Twitch.tv, the internet’s primary hub for video game streaming and esports videos, there’s a parallel set of icons and a very specific vocabulary that goes with them. If you’re new to Twitch, you probably have no idea what a “PogChamp” or a “Kappa” are, or whose faces represent them, but they’re such an ingrained part of the culture. that popular broadcasters often say them out loud while livestreaming. And even though Twitter doesn’t support Twitch emotes, people steeped in the culture will spell them out in tweets, too.
Headsets that use smartphones to generate virtual reality imagery are a lot less expensive than standalone VR headsets like the Oculus Rift, though obviously you’ll have to factor in the cost of a compatible high-resolution mobile device. Google’s latest version of its Daydream View headset works with Google’s own Pixel smartphones and an expanded range of Android-based phones from Samsung, Asus, LG and Motorola, among others. Unlike some cheaper all-plastic smartphone VR headsets, the lightweight Daydream View is covered with breathable fabric and designed to stay comfortable for long periods of play.

The overall construction is quite sturdy and its light weight in case you need to move it around or travel with it to LAN parties. Underneath the desk you’ll also find a little cable management contraption to help with organization. Lastly, it comes in quite a few colors to fit your personality — red, black, blue, green, and white. The Arozzi Arena is awesome because of the color choices to match your style, portability, special and large surface designed strictly for gaming and overall affordability.

PogChamp, one of the oldest emotes on Twitch, is based on Gootecks, a professional Street Fighter player, and is mainly used to express surprise in response to something happening on stream. PogChamp is based on this video from 2000, but was given the name PogChamp because of a Mad Catz fight stick promo released in 2011 for a tournament that Gootecks was competing in.
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Keyboards aren't the only devices that feature mechanical switches with a satisfying "click" sound — you'll also find them on the SteelSeries Rival 600 mouse, which also has the full-spectrum RGB lighting that seems almost standard now in every piece of dedicated gaming gear. Although modestly priced at under $50, this gaming mouse features a 12,000 DPI optical sensor for pinpoint accuracy, customizable weights, and even a depth sensor that eliminates “cursor drift” if you lift the mouse off the mouse pad.
Logitech’s goal while creating this mouse was essentially to replicate more than enough movement and speed of the gamers arm, making it a mouse that is able to keep up with those short burst arm movements without causing a delay in speed. With this mouse, the Logitech G402 Hyperion Fury allows you take your gaming capabilities to the next level. We recommend this one if the previous mouse was a bit too expensive for your budget and you wanted to upgrade yet save a little more cash at the same time.
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